Session types

Symposia

Symposia present research on one topic or theme, providing a coherent set of papers for discussion. Symposia sessions consist of three or four oral presentations and a discussant, led by a chairperson.

Proposals for a symposium should consist of a general abstract for the proposed symposium, as well as an abstract for each individual paper presentation. The general abstract should describe the overarching theme of the symposium. The paper abstracts should be up to 500 words (excluding references). Abstracts for empirical papers should address: 1) The background and aims of the study and research questions, 2) Methodology (including participants, context, materials and data analyses), 3) Results and 4) Discussion/conclusions (including discussion of methodological challenges and implications). Conceptual and methodological contributions can follow a different structure.

Paper presentations

Individual paper sessions involve oral presentations of empirical, methodological or theoretical papers and discussions with the audience.

Individual paper abstracts should be up to 500 words (excluding references). Abstracts for empirical papers should address: 1) The background and aims of the study and research questions, 2) Methodology (including participants, context, materials and data analyses), 3) Results and 4) Discussion/conclusions (including discussion of methodological challenges and implications). Conceptual and methodological contributions can follow a different structure.

Poster presentations

Poster sessions will involve 5-minute presentations of individual posters followed by an unstructured period where the audience will be invited to visit and comment on posters.

Poster abstracts should be up to 500 words (excluding references). Abstracts for empirical papers should address: 1) The background and aims of the study and research questions, 2) Methodology (including participants, context, materials and data analyses), 3) Results and 4) Discussion/conclusions (including discussion of methodological challenges and implications). Conceptual and methodological contributions can follow a different structure.

Research ‘fail’ sessions

Research ‘fail’ sessions involve oral presentations of papers that discuss research ‘fails’ – instances where research methods and designs didn’t work according to plan – and what these experiences can teach us about doing research, as well as discussions with the audience. Proposals can draw on several studies and can address, among others, aborted ideas, “near-misses”, and attempts to “turn things around”. Their emphasis can be empirical, methodological, or conceptual.

Research ‘fail’ abstracts should be up to 500 words (excluding references). Abstracts for empirical papers should address: 1) The background and aims of the study and research questions, 2) Methodology (including participants, context, materials and data analyses), 3) the nature of the research fail, and 4) Discussion/conclusions, with a focus on what the research fail can teach us about doing research. Conceptual and methodological contributions can follow a different structure but should follow the overall research fail format mentioned above.

Post-conference workshops

Post-conference workshops will provide interactive contexts for an in-depth examination, discussion and elaboration of methodological approaches. The workshops will be organized on September 11th. Each workshop should provide an in-depth introduction to a methodological approach, which can then be further explored and critically scrutinized for its potential and limitations to address key issues in research on learning and education. Workshops should also discuss the key challenges and/or pitfalls involved in the methodological approach. Workshop proposals should be submitted through the submission system.

Proposals for workshops should be up to 500 words (excluding references). They should contain: 1) the topic of the workshop, 2) a rationale for why the method or methodology covered is important, 3) the workshop objectives, 4) a description of the activities planned for the workshop, 5) the contribution expected from the participants, 6) possible outcomes.